0485

Document Title Government Code and Cypher School: Signals Intelligence Passed to the Prime Minister, Messages and Correspondence
Reference HW 1/485
Conflicts Second World War
Themes Military Intelligence and Operations, Foreign Policy and International Relations
Regions East Asia, Europe, Middle East, Pacific, South Asia
Countries Australia, Bulgaria, Burma, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, Yugoslavia
Document Type Signals Intelligence
Organisations Government Code and Cypher School, Security Service
People Edward Bridges, Adolf Hitler

Description

A file of signals intelligence reports, messages, and correspondence issued by the Government Code and Cypher School and sent by the head ('C') of the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) to the Prime Minister, Winston Churchill. This file includes the following reports: Naval Headlines, covering the Gneisenau being in Gdynia on April 6; that the Luetzow is exercising in the Baltic; and on Italian convoys in the Mediterranean; the Japanese minister in Sofia reports Soviet propaganda and Communist activities in Bulgaria, on March 31; a Japanese report of a British raid on St Nazaire, on April 6; the Portuguese minister in Ankara reports Von Papen's views on German intentions towards Turkey, on April 6; the Turkish minister in Chungking reports the Soviet ambassador's views on Japanese intentions, on April 3; the Turkish minister in Berne reports a discussion with the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Turco-German relations, on April 4; the Turkish ambassador in London reports views on the war given in the British press, on April 4; and the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs repeated a report from Sofia relating to Soviet-Bulgarian relations and the possible demands to be made for Bulgarian support for the German spring offensive, on April 7.

Keywords

naval intelligence, warships, German U-boats, Italian navy, shipping, diplomatic intelligence, Soviet foreign policy, Soviet intelligence services, espionage, propaganda, commando raids, Turkish neutrality, Pacific War

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